Last week, the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge turned 50 years old, and celebrated by having its building re-dedicated. 
At the invitation of its Worshipful Master, WB Jimmy Dyches, the Lodge hosted almost 200 Masons from throughout the state and the Grand Lodge of Masons, to include Most Worshipful David J. DeChant Sr., Grand Master of Masons to South Carolina.
The Lodge had a luncheon prior to the ceremonial and in attendance was Goose Creek Mayor Michael Heitzler, who presented the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge with a proclamation declaring June 1 as the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge Day. 
Most Worshipful David DeChant Sr., and Worshipful Master Jimmy Dyches proudly accepted the proclamation.
Once the Grand Lodge and Goose Creek Lodge were formally opened, the celebration began. 
While the wives, families and guests were invited outside building, all the Masons formed together and marched to the front of the building.  The Grand Master was escorted to the front of the building and he, the lodge's architect, RWB Tom Leverette, and several of the Grand Lodge Officers laid the cornerstone.
For Masons, the most important stone laid when the building is constructed is the cornerstone.  The cornerstone (or foundation stone) concept is derived from the first stone set in the construction of a masonry building, important since all other stones will be set in reference to this stone, thus determining the position of the entire structure.
Over time a cornerstone became a ceremonial masonry stone, or replica set in a prominent location on the outside of a building, with an inscription on the stone indicating the construction dates of the building and the names of the Grand Master and other significant individuals (for the Goose Creek Masonic lodge, the cornerstone names the current Worshipful Master and the Grand Master).
The Lodge also made a time capsule that is sealed until the Lodge celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2063.  Inside the time capsule is a listing of the current Goose Creek members, the current listing of the Grand Lodge Officers, the  John L Flynn Order of Eastern Star members, the DeMolay and Rainbow members, other mementos, and a copy of The Gazette newspaper. 
The Worshipful Master told everyone that the odds of any of the members being present for the 100th are slim, but some of the DeMolay boys and Rainbow girls may, and it should be great for them to be in attendance to let everyone know in 2063 how the lodge was in 2013.
Before the ceremony ended, Most Worshipful David Dechant told everyone that he was honored to be at the Goose Creek Lodge. He told everyone that Masonry is one of the oldest and honorable fraternities in the world.  It is dedicated to promoting improvement in the character of its members.
A Mason is taught to be a good citizen, to be of good character, and to care for those less fortunate. 
 
 
 
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Goose Creek Masonic Lodge celebrates 50 years

  • Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Photo Provided -- WB Denny Dayton with the time capsule, which includes a copy of The Gazette.

 
Last week, the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge turned 50 years old, and celebrated by having its building re-dedicated. 
At the invitation of its Worshipful Master, WB Jimmy Dyches, the Lodge hosted almost 200 Masons from throughout the state and the Grand Lodge of Masons, to include Most Worshipful David J. DeChant Sr., Grand Master of Masons to South Carolina.
The Lodge had a luncheon prior to the ceremonial and in attendance was Goose Creek Mayor Michael Heitzler, who presented the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge with a proclamation declaring June 1 as the Goose Creek Masonic Lodge Day. 
Most Worshipful David DeChant Sr., and Worshipful Master Jimmy Dyches proudly accepted the proclamation.
Once the Grand Lodge and Goose Creek Lodge were formally opened, the celebration began. 
While the wives, families and guests were invited outside building, all the Masons formed together and marched to the front of the building.  The Grand Master was escorted to the front of the building and he, the lodge's architect, RWB Tom Leverette, and several of the Grand Lodge Officers laid the cornerstone.
For Masons, the most important stone laid when the building is constructed is the cornerstone.  The cornerstone (or foundation stone) concept is derived from the first stone set in the construction of a masonry building, important since all other stones will be set in reference to this stone, thus determining the position of the entire structure.
Over time a cornerstone became a ceremonial masonry stone, or replica set in a prominent location on the outside of a building, with an inscription on the stone indicating the construction dates of the building and the names of the Grand Master and other significant individuals (for the Goose Creek Masonic lodge, the cornerstone names the current Worshipful Master and the Grand Master).
The Lodge also made a time capsule that is sealed until the Lodge celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2063.  Inside the time capsule is a listing of the current Goose Creek members, the current listing of the Grand Lodge Officers, the  John L Flynn Order of Eastern Star members, the DeMolay and Rainbow members, other mementos, and a copy of The Gazette newspaper. 
The Worshipful Master told everyone that the odds of any of the members being present for the 100th are slim, but some of the DeMolay boys and Rainbow girls may, and it should be great for them to be in attendance to let everyone know in 2063 how the lodge was in 2013.
Before the ceremony ended, Most Worshipful David Dechant told everyone that he was honored to be at the Goose Creek Lodge. He told everyone that Masonry is one of the oldest and honorable fraternities in the world.  It is dedicated to promoting improvement in the character of its members.
A Mason is taught to be a good citizen, to be of good character, and to care for those less fortunate. 
 
 
 

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