As the flu season continues to be one of the worst in decades, the Centers for Disease Control is reporting widespread outbreaks in many states.
While anyone can get the flu, seniors are especially susceptible to the virus and are at greater risk for serious flu-related complications that can lead to hospitalization and even death. Ninety percent of flu-related deaths and more than half of flu-related hospitalizations occur in people age 65 and older.
“The flu can be very dangerous for seniors, so we are concerned about this recent outbreak,” said Jeff Huber, president of Home Instead Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care franchise network. "We encourage seniors and their families to take extra precautions to protect themselves from the virus.”
To fight the flu, senior care experts recommend the following:
• Get a flu shot: Experts strongly encourage all seniors and those in frequent contact with seniors to get vaccinated if they haven’t already done so. Medicare covers one vaccine per flu season.
• Wash hands: Wash hands with soap frequently, especially after coughing or sneezing. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Cover coughs and sneezes: Droplets from a sneeze or a cough can travel up to six feet. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and dispose of the tissue immediately. If a tissue is not available, cough or sneeze into the elbow, not the hands.
• Avoid contact: Those with flu-like symptoms, especially school-aged children, should avoid contact with senior loved ones.
• Rest, eat well:  Get plenty of sleep, drink plenty of fluids and eat healthy foods. Experts also recommend a diet rich in Vitamins C and D and plenty of exercise.
If senior loved ones begin to show symptoms of the flu, contact their health care provider immediately. Antiviral medications (like Tamiflu) are available to help make symptoms less severe.
For more information visit www.caregiverstress.com.
 
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Flu season worst in years

  • Wednesday, January 23, 2013

 
As the flu season continues to be one of the worst in decades, the Centers for Disease Control is reporting widespread outbreaks in many states.
While anyone can get the flu, seniors are especially susceptible to the virus and are at greater risk for serious flu-related complications that can lead to hospitalization and even death. Ninety percent of flu-related deaths and more than half of flu-related hospitalizations occur in people age 65 and older.
“The flu can be very dangerous for seniors, so we are concerned about this recent outbreak,” said Jeff Huber, president of Home Instead Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care franchise network. "We encourage seniors and their families to take extra precautions to protect themselves from the virus.”
To fight the flu, senior care experts recommend the following:
• Get a flu shot: Experts strongly encourage all seniors and those in frequent contact with seniors to get vaccinated if they haven’t already done so. Medicare covers one vaccine per flu season.
• Wash hands: Wash hands with soap frequently, especially after coughing or sneezing. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Cover coughs and sneezes: Droplets from a sneeze or a cough can travel up to six feet. Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue and dispose of the tissue immediately. If a tissue is not available, cough or sneeze into the elbow, not the hands.
• Avoid contact: Those with flu-like symptoms, especially school-aged children, should avoid contact with senior loved ones.
• Rest, eat well:  Get plenty of sleep, drink plenty of fluids and eat healthy foods. Experts also recommend a diet rich in Vitamins C and D and plenty of exercise.
If senior loved ones begin to show symptoms of the flu, contact their health care provider immediately. Antiviral medications (like Tamiflu) are available to help make symptoms less severe.
For more information visit www.caregiverstress.com.
 

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